Dog Breeds

Dog Breeds Prone to Seizures



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Seizures are very serious, not only in people, but in dogs as well. It is a very genetic disease that can be stopped with proper medicine from your local vet. The seizures act up just in the same way as if a human would have one, when neurons over act inside the part of the brain called the cerebrum. They do not connect and give off the need chemical balance to stop the body from the overactive shaking. There are a few dog breeds that are actually prone to getting seizures, and here they are.

The Keeshond –

This cute small dog in the spitz family may be connected to getting a seizure and having epilepsy, a good thing to check if you think the dog is an epileptic, is make sure they have not had any trauma to the head. These small dogs have very tiny heads, and a more slightly soft skull than other dog breeds. They can get seriously injured so it is very wise to get it checked out if they have fallen hard or have gotten hit on the head hard enough to cause them to act in a slow manner for a bit.

The poodle –

Yes one of the most gifted and smart dog breeds can also get a seizure, if it is in that dog’s certain genetics. One of the most common forms of a poodle getting an epileptic attack is if they have been sick overtime and on numerous occasions, such as getting tape worms or blood worms, getting a lot of flus and colds, all these will affect the brain in a manner to cause the neurons to lash out and not be able to connect to the cerebrum. This is most especially so with the poodle, so keep them fit and active, and mot importantly, healthy.

Cocker spaniel –

This small British breed of dog is another that is quick to get a seizure if it is already in their genes. One of the easiest ways to spot if the dog is an epileptic is if they act very normal and friendly one day and the next they are more sluggish, dropping, and do not want to play. They may even act a bit aggressive in nature simply because they are not feeling up to par. Get them checked out with a vet to see what’s up.

Seizures are no laughing matter, make sure your dog has monthly vet visits and ask about any forms and causes of this.

  

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